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LAS C A MISCELLANEA 

VOL. 5 y OCT. 1957 

hoUNTY OF LOS ANGELES 




Los Angeles •gasas' Arboretum 

301 No. Baldwin Avenue, Arcadia, California 



Honorable Board of Supervisors, 

County of Los Angeles, 

501 Hall of Records, 

Los Angeles 12, California. 

Gentlemen : 

On behalf of the staff I am pleased to present 
this report of our activities during the past fiscal year. 
Accomplishments of development of the grounds, the education 
program, and the research program are presented in this 
report. 

With the dedication of the new Administration 
Building and Gatehouse, the Arboretum came of age in 
December 1956. These new facilities have allowed opening 
of the grounds to visitors on a seven day a week basis and 
have resulted in an extensive use of the Arboretum by the 
public. This is shown by an attendance of 79,000 during 
the first six months of 1957 which equals the attendance 
for the entire year of 1956. 

Appreciation is expressed to the public spirited 
citizens who are Governors of this Department and who 
donate their time to its development and operation. Like- 
wise gratitude is felt to the Trustees of California 
Arboretum Foundation, Inc. who have given generously of 
their time and money in initiating and sponsoring the 
Arboretum as a public institution. 



Respectfully submitted, 

William S. Stewart, 
Director. 



LOS ANGELES COUNTY 



DEPARTMENT OF ARBORETA AND BOTANIC GARDENS 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 



HERBERT C. LEGG 



2ND DISTRICT 



3RD DISTRICT 



ARTHUR J. WILL, CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS 

RESTORATIONS 

HORTICULTURE 

PROPAGATION 

DEMONSTRATION HOME GARDENS 

ARBORETUM LIBRARY 

ARBORETUM VISITORS 

EDUCATION 

RESEARCH 

SPECIAL EVENTS 

CALIFORNIA ARBORETUM FOUNDATION, INC. 

PICTURE CREDIT 



Board of Governors 



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« 




CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS 




Dedication program for the Administration 
Building and Information Center at the Los 
Angeles State & County Arboretum, Dec. H, 
1956. 



. CAPITAL : 
THE ARBORETUM DURING THE PAST YEAR 
AS INSURANCE FOR THE FUTURE HAS BEEN 
THE INSTALLATION OF TWO DIAGONALLY 
OPPOSITE FIRE HYDRANTS AT THE HUGO 
REID ADOBE, THE "LUCKY" BALDWIN 
CARRIAGE HOUSE AND THE "QUEEN ANNE 
COTTAGE". 

THE LOS ANGELES COUNTY FLOOD 
CONTROL DISTRICT AND THE ARMY ENGI- 
NEERS COMPLETED THE FLOOD CONTROL 
CHANNEL THROUGH THE ARBORETUM 
GROUNDS. ANOTHER BIT OF INSURANCE 
AGAINST HEAVY RAINS IN THE FUTURE. 



Dr. Stewart, Director, signals 
the "sensitive plant", Mimosa pudlca . 
In response to the signal, the 
leaves closed an electrical circuit 
which cut the ribbon. Thus the 
Administration Building was officially 
opened by a plant. 



THE MAJOR CAPITAL IMPROVE- 
MENT DURING THE PAST YEAR WAS THE 
CONSTRUCTION AND OCCUPANCY OF THE 
NEW ADMINISTRATION BUILDING AND 
THE GATEHOUSE. THE MODERN AND 
INTERESTING DESIGN OF THESE BUILD- 
INGS CONTRASTS SHARPLY WITH THE 
SIMPLE STRUCTURES OF THE HUGO REID 
ADOBE ON THE ARBORETUM GROUNDS. 
THE ADOBE REPRESENTS THE "HIDE AND 
TALLOW" DAYS OF EARLY CALIFORNIA. 

THE NEW ADMINISTRATION AND 
GATEHOUSE BUILDINGS ALSO CONTRAST 
WITH THE GINGERBREAD OF THE "QUEEN 
ANNE COTTAGE", CONSTRUCTED BY 
"LUCKY" BALDWIN IN 1879, ALSO 
LOCATED ON THE ARBORETUM GROUNDS. 

RECOGNITION OF THE OUTSTAND- 
ING DESIGN OF THE NEW STRUCTURES 
IS SHOWN BY THE FACT THAT THEY 
WERE SELECTED BY THE CONCRETE 
MASONRY ASSOCIATION AS THE BEST 
EXAMPLES OF CEMENT BLOCK STRUCTURES 
BUILT IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 
DURING THE PAST YEAR. 





Stairway and entrance to 
Administration Building. 



The Entrance Pavilion. The glass 
cases provide display areas for 
horticultural and botanical 
subjects. 




Lecture Room. Seating approxi- 
mately sixty adults, classes, 
staff meetings, horticultural 
society and garden club activities 
are -held here. 





An enclosed patio at the fast end of the 
building serves for informal meetings 
and an over-flow space for Lecture Room 



A well equipped, small 
laboratory furnishes 
facilities for experimental 




RESTORATION 



THE 1955-56 CALIFORNIA STATE LEGISLATURE APPROPRIATED $102,040 TO 
RESTORE THE "LUCKY" BALDWIN CARRIAGE HOUSE AND THE HUGO REID ADOBE ON THE 
ARBORETUM GROUNDS. THIS ACTION WAS PROMPTED BY THE OUTSTANDING EXAMPLE OF 
RESTORATION OF "LUCKY" BALDWIN'S "QUEEN ANNE COTTAGE" WHICH HAD BEEN ACCOM- 
PLISHED ENTIRELY BY PRIVATE FUNDS RAISED BY THE HISTORICAL COMMITTEE OF THE 
CALIFORNIA ARBORETUM FOUNDATION, INC. 

DURING THE WINTER OF 1956 ARCHAEOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS WERE BEGUN AT 
THE HUGO REID ADOBE. THESE STUDIES ARE CONDUCTED BY DR. J. W. WALLACE, 
DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY, UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA AND HIS 
STUDENTS. WORKING IN COOPERATION WITH DR. WALLACE, THE ARCHAEOLOG IC AL RESEARCH 
ASSOCIATES OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA HAVE CONTRIBUTED MANY HOURS OF HELP. AMONG 
THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL ASSOCIATES, MR. ROGER DESAUTELS AND MR. KRITZMAN DESERVE 
SPECIAL CREDIT FOR THEIR PART IN THIS PROJECT. IT IS IMPORTANT TO NOTE THAT 
THE ARCHAEOLOGISTS ARE DONATING THFIR TIME AND KNOWLEDGE TO THIS PROJECT AT 
NO COST TO EITHER THE STATE OR THE COUNTY. THIS SPLENDID CONTRIBUTION TO 
OUR KNOWLEDGE OF HISTORY IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA IN VIEW OF THE ARBORETUM IS 
DEEPLY APPRECIATED BY ALL CONCERNED. 




hugo Reid Adobe foundation under the former Baldwin Annex. Workers: 
Gary Coon trowels in Pit A8; Dr. Wallace shovels back dirt in Fit A6- 
Ken Dampf in Pit A5. ' 




Archaeological students at work inside 
of the rooms of the Hugo Reid Adobe. 




.Upon completion of the restoration, this will 
be the most elegant carriage house in the 
country side. The walls and ceilings pf the 
first floor are panelled in tongue-and-groove 
redwood and cedar. 



HORTICULTURE 



IT IS TO THE CREDIT OF THE CHIEF HORTICULTURIST AND HIS STAFF OF 
EXPERIENCED ARBORETUM GARDENERS, PARK MAINTENANCE MEN, EQUIPMENT OPERATORS 
AND PARK MAINTENANCE MEN HELPERS THAT THE VARIED AND SEPARATE PLANTINGS 
OF THE ARBORETUM BROUGHT MORE VISITORS TO THE ARBORETUM THIS YEAR THAN 
EVER BEFORE. 

ONLY A BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE ACCOMPLISHMENTS OF THESE MEN CAN BE IN- 
CLUDED IN THIS REPORT. ONE MUST VISIT THE ARBORETUM TO APPRECIATE THE 
HORTICULTURAL BEAUTY AND VALUE CONTRIBUTED BY THESE PLANTSMEN TO THE 
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA LANDSCAPE. 



k^§:-M 



<& 






Ji ft 




A thumb-nail 
The border cc 
within these 



? of the Horticultural Sections of the Arboretum. 
Lsts of sketches of plants of representatives 
;tions. 



AUSTRALIA 



/THIS SECTION IS NOT FOR THE IMPATIENT GARDENER. THE EMPHASIS IS 
PRIMARILY ON TREES, TREES UNIQUE BECAUSE THEY ARE BEING GROW AS MUCH FOR 
THEIR CONSPICUOUS FLOWERS AS FOR THE SHAPE OF THEIR LEAF AND LIMB. 

SOLITARY AND GROUPS OF EUCALYPTUS SPECIES ARE COMING OF JGE WITH FJCH 
PASSING YEAR, FORMING A t F 0RE3T« OF SUCH TREES. 




HIBISCUS HUGELII . ALSO CALLED THE "BLUE HIBISCUS" 
HAS CAUGHT THE FANCY OF THE NURSERY TRADE. THIS IS 
ALSO A NATIVE OF AUSTRALIA. 



SOUTH AFRICA 



SPRINGTIME IN SOUTH AFRICA DAZZLES THE VIEWER. THE ACRE OF COMPOSITES 
.(SUNFLOWER FAMILY) FROM GROUND COVER HEIGHT TO SMALL TREES, RANGE IN COLOR FROM 
ORANGE TO YELLOW TO WHITE TO BLUE TO RED. NATIVE WILDFLOWERS IN AFRICA, THESE 
PLANTS WILL SOMEDAY BEAUTIFY HOMES HERE AS OUTSTANDING HORTICULTURAL GEMS. 

NO LONGER MUST THIS SECTION BE RESTRICTED TO VIEWS FROM A DISTANCE. 
CONVENIENT PATHES NOW LEAD THE INTERESTED AMONG THE VARIOUS SPECIES FOR A 
CLOSE-UP LOOK. 

THE LOS ANGELES CITY FLOWER - "BIRD OF PARADISE" - IS FOUND IN THIS SECTION, 
FOR IT TOO IS A NATIVE OF SOUTH AFRICA. 

SOUTH AFRICAN SUCCULENTS — MESEMBRYANTHEMUMS, CRASSULAS, AND EUPHORBIAS 
CATCH THE EYE OF "LIMITED SPACE" GARDENERS AS THEY TOUR THE WESTERN EDGE OF 
THIS SECTION. 



BALDWIN ESPLANADE 



T ™™ W ™ H0UT THE BENEFIT 0F COLORED PICTURES, IT IS IMPOSSIBLE TO CREATE WITH 
^npf/^mno^ *">» THIS *°*>Wtt. ICE-PUNTS (MESEMBRYANTHEMUMS) 
NOW FORM A FOUR BLOCK LONG CARPET BORDER FROM COLORADO BOULEVARD TO THE 

^KI^fF^P- ^ FIM > CREAM > ™">W AND WHITE FLOWERS MAKE UP THIS 
FciitSXAN CARPET ■ . 

pttadt^SJ^^^ ^-^ C0RNER, BECOMES MORE LOVELY AS THE TREES AND SHRUBS, 

2^522 F™ mL0W BL00MS > MATURES. THINNING OUR INITIAL PLANTING HAS 

^SSLS?™ 13 T ° BEAR 0N ^ F0RM 0F ^H 0F THE MANY SPECIES WITHIN THIS 
COLLECTION. 

OF PT^ IN nyr^ A ?^ptfi2? j0WING THE SPRINGTIM S BURST OF COLOR, INDIVIDUALS 
nln^?' DYCHIAS > CORAL TREES, CEANOTHUS, CASSIAS, CRAPE MYRTLES AND AGAVES 
CARRY ON THE BEAUT IF ICAT ION OF THE PARKWAY «"ua*» aw u*MVt> 



ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 



OUR FRONT YARD IS GIVEN OVER TO A VARIED PLANT COLLECTION, REPRESENTING 
JL NUMBER OF PLANT FORMS, TEXTURES, COLORS AND NATIVE COUNTRIES. 




Dominating the scene to the left of the stairway is a clump of Phoenix 
reclinata or the Senegal date palm, a gift to the Arboretum. The 
sloping expanse to the right of the stair is covered with the herb, 



SOUTH AMERICA 



"MANANA" NO LONGER WAS HEARD IN ANY DISCUSSION CONCERNING THE DEVELOP- 
MENT OF THIS SECTION. THE COMPLETION OF THE FLOOD CONTROL CHANNEL AND THE 
INSTALLATION OF THE SPRINKLER SYSTEM CHANGED THE WORK SCHEDULE TO "JuOELANTEMOS" 

ON A MESA-LIKE MOUND, A GARDEN OF CACTUS SPECIMENS, NATIVE TO OUR 
SOUTHERN NEIGHBORS, CATCHES THE EYE. ACROSS THE FLAT IN FRONT OF THIS MOUND 
MORE NATIVES, TREES AND SHRUBS, NOW APPEAR ESTABLISHED. IN ALL, OVER 700 
PLANTS WERE SET OUT IN THIS SECTION WHICH HAD TO BE NEGLECTED FOR SO MANY 



MEDITERRANEAN 



THIS SECTION ALSO SUFFERED IN ITS DEVELOPMENT AND FOR THE SAME REASONS 
LISTED FOR THE SOUTH AMERICAN AREA. HOWEVER, BEFORE THE PLANTING SEASON 
ENDED, SEVERAL HUNDRED OLD WORLD PLANTS WERE SET OUT, GIVING THIS SECTION 
AN APPEARANCE OF BEING INHABITED AT LEAST. 



PALM a BAMBOO 

THIS YEAR, NO OTHER SECTION 

.RECEIVED MORE ATTENTION THAN OUR GROW- * 4 f v M|a ra» m 

ING COLLECTION OF PALMS AND BAMBOOS. ? : t **k ' T5Hfr \B^ Tl 

IT IS RAPIDLY BECOMING THE MOST VARIED ..?-4RS| /6& \wL T 

COLLECTION OF ITS KIND ON THE WEST ,>^^ villi ] 

COAST. ^ V 4/WM\>1\ 

NURSERYMEN ATTRACTED BY THE ORNA- - '- 1\ f^' V £ \ J 

MENTAL APPEAL OF THE MANY SPECIES IN- *\\% Wi\t\\ fi 

QUIRED ABOUT THE AVAILABILITY OF NUR- ,v v -\ ^ W^fflkA\l 

SERY STOCK AND CULTURE METHODS. THE \*\ ¥fe *C»^\ 

PUBLIC WANTED TO KNOW WHERE THEY MIGHT ^kML Wfc\ 1 

OBTAIN FLANT MATERIAL. STUDENTS FOUND \ lk lk'^V 1 

THESE TV/O GROUPS A FASCINATING STUDY, ^ t* m VL*% 

BOTANICALLY. N^ 4 \\ II m 

TO SEE A PALM WITH MAROON LEAVF3 ' \ B%1 \ \ l\\l^lll 1 ; 

(LiHSTOJA MARIAE) OR ONE WHOSE LF; . - \ ^m.^ >■ ^W% 

HAVE A BLUISH CAST ( ERYTHEA ARMATA ) OR Ql|mlH| fK» 

A YELLOW AND GREEN STRIPED CANE OF k •"'^TjKyl H * i \ WM 

BAMBOO, DEBUNKS THE LAYMAN'S IDEA THAT * ^c '— *, V* \ '^jHBRX tPI 
ALL SUCH PLANTS COME ONLY IN GREEN! 



Bambusa rcaLtiplex 'Alphonse Karr». 
A yellow cane, striped with green. 



HERB GARDEN 



A RUSTIC FENCE: BEGINNINGS OF A ROCK GARDEN: AN AISLE OF PURPLE LEAVED 
T^™ PLUMS: A DIPPING WLL: A SPLIT-LEVEL JEWEL BOWL BRAISER WATER FALL: 
ALL THESE THINGS ARE NEW TO THE HERB GARDEN. 



AND SOME 900 PUNTS 



nr.™J m IfflMBERS 0F THE SOUTTffiRN CALIFORNIA UNIT OF THE HERB SOCIETY OF AMERICA 
S™^ T ° SUPP0RT THIS UNIQUE PLANT DISPLAY, FINANCIALLY AS WELL AS IN ITS 
225S™ N ° F DEVEL0R ' I E N T AND BY ASSISTING IN THE PLANTING AND CARE OF THE 
Y^AR™PO THEY ^ N ° T FINISHED VITH THFIR PLANS EITHER > WATCH F0R ^T 




TEST 8 DISPLAY GARDEN 

ADJACENT TO THE HERB GARDEN, ONE STEPS FROM AN OLD WORLD FORMAL GARDEN 
INTO A MODERN DISPLAY ARRANGEMENT OF THE 'NEW' IN BOTH ANNUALS AND PERENNIALS. 
LATE SUMMER THROUGH MAY, THE ANNUAL FLOWER BEDS CONTRIBUTED BRIGHT COLOR TO 
THE VISITORS TOUR. MORE THAN 20,000 PLANTS WERE REQUIRED FOR THIS SPLASH 
OF COLOR. PLANTINGS INCLUDING AMARYLLIS, DAY LILIES, IRIS, 'MUMS 1 , GERANIUMS 
AND PELARGONIUMS ARE PERMANENT AND APPEAR IN SEMI-CIRCULAR BEDS. 



TALLAC KNOLL 



A DIVERSE PLANTING 
AREA BEST DESCRIBES THIS 
SECTION. 

AT ITS SUMMIT, IS THE 
1 GARDEN OF EDEN 1 . FOR- 
MERLY AN EARTH RESERVOIR, 
NOW PLANTED TO TROPICAL 
VEGETATION. CYMBIDIUM 
ORCHIDS, COFFEE TREES, 
AND PHYLLODENDRONS CREATE 
A LUSH, INVITING SHADY 



THE BROMELLIAD SOCIETY 
MATERIALLY AIDED THIS 
GARDEN WITH A COLLECTION 
OF COLORFUL EXOTIC PLANTS. 



ANOTHER SPECIALIST 
HAS GIVEN US THE BEST IN 
HER COLLECTION OF BEGONIAS. 




A Halaconia in the 'Garden of Eden 1 



FOUR ADDITIONAL PLANTINGS ARE NOW QUITE EVIDENT AROUND THE SHOULDERS OF 
THIS HILL. 1) A COLLECTION OF AVOCADO SPECIES, 2) AN ORNAMENTAL FIG COLLECTION, 
3) A PINETUM (COLLECTION OF CONIFERS), AND 4) THE BEGINNINGS OF AN ECONOMIC 
STONE FRUIT ORCHARD. 

IT IS ON TALLAC KNOLL THAT OUR NATIVE STAND OF ENGLEMANN AND COAST LIVE 
OAKS MAY BE FOUND. THE COMBINATION OF TWO WELL TIMED SPRAYINGS AND EFFICIENT 
TREE CARE BY OUR ARBORIST AND HIS CREW, BROUGHT CUT THE MAJESTIC BEAUTY OF 
: THESE FINE OLD TREES. 




LUX ARBORETUM 

DURING THE PAST YEAR, THE LUX ARBORETUM PROPERTY HAS BEEN MAINTAINED BY 
AN ARBORETUM GARDENER AND ONE HELPER. THESE TOO MEN HAVE DONE AN OUTSTAND- 
ING JOB OF CLEARING PATHS, PRUNING PLANTS, WATERING AND MAINTAINING THE 
PROPERTY. THE TRANSFORMATION OF THE GROUNDS FROM THE PREVIOUS YEAR WHEN IT 
WAS COMPLETELY NEGLECTED HAVE BEEN REMARKABLE. IT IS HOPED THAT DURING THE 
YEAR 1957-58 PROBATE OF THIS PROPERTY WILL BE CLOSED AND WORK CAN MOVE AHEAD 
TOWARD A MASTER PLAN FOR DEVELOPING THIS AREA,. 

ANTELOPE VALLEY TEST STATION 

n.r^Jt T THE m, ^ JES ' I: 0F THE PALMDALE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND THE PALMDALE 
GARDEN CLUB, DURING THE FALL AND WINTER OF 1956, SURVEYS WERE MADE FOR 
POSSIBLE SITES FOR AN ARBORETUM TEST STATION IN THE ANTELOPE VALLEY. THE 
SITE FINALLY SELECTED WAS A THREE AND ONE-HALF ACRE TRACT OF LAND ON 
S?55! 0WNED BY THE L0S ANGE LES COUNTY SANITATION DISTRICT NORTHEAST OF 
T^^' DISCU3310 ^ WITH THE SANITATION DISTRICT LED TO ESTABLISHMENT OF 
A LEASE TO THE ARBORETUM FOR THIS PROPERTY FOR ITS USE AS A TEST STATION. 

tvn ufl^xS™ ° F 1956 ' 0NE ACRE 0F THE ^ WAS ^NCED TO EXCLUDE RABBITS 
^im ^SUf INSTA ™> T0 A™ IRRIGATION OF PLANTS. PLANTING WAS 
^pt^S^^v SP ™ T TB1E > 0VER 50 ° FLAmS GR0WN AT A* ^ 1 * HAVE 
^vtS^L IHEY PRESENT OVER 100 DIFFERENT KIND OF PLANTS NOT NOW 
^^T^^^^I^^' TIffi IR GROWTH AT THE TEST STATION WILL BE 
FOLLOWED WITH GREAT INTEREST BY ALL OF THE COMMUNITIES OF THE ANTELOPE VALLEY. 



AT THE TIME OF INSTALLATION OF THE FENCING, RESIDENTS OF PALMDALE 
LEARNED OF THE OPERATION AND ORGANIZED AN IMPROMPTU GROUND BREAKING CEREMONY. 
THE PRINCIPAL OF THE PALMDALE HIGH SCHOOL, THE PALMDALE GARDEN CLUB, AND 
THE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE ALL MADE BRIEF COMMENTS TO THE GATHERING WHO HAD 
COME OUT TO THE TEST STATION IN A CARAVAN OF OVER 100 CARS. THE INTEREST 
AND ENTHUSIASM OF THE PALMDALE GARDEN CLUB IN THIS PROJECT IS OUTSTANDING. 
THEY VISIT THE TEST STATION REGULARLY AND FOLLOW THE GROWTH OF THE NEW 
INTRODUCTIONS WITH INTEREST. THEY HAVE ASSUMED FULL RESPONSIBILITY FOR 
SUPPLYING ONE OF THE WO NECESSARY WEEKLY IRRIGATIONS AT THIS TEST SITE. 




rs. Charles Thomas of Palmdele Garden Club, (center) 
r. F. H. Bourne (right) and Mr. Don Wool ley inspect 
Hawaiian mahogany tree in the test station plantings. 



DISTRIBUTION OF PLANTS 



DURING THE 1956-57 CALIFORNIA STATE LEGISLATURE, ASSEMBLY BILL #430 
WAS INTRODUCED BY ASSEMBLYMEN ERNEST R. GEDDES. THIS BILL AUTHORIZES THE 
ARBORETUM TO DISTRIBUTE NEW PLANTS TO COMMERCIAL NURSERYMEN AT COST. THIS 
IS THE FINAL STEP IN THE SUCCESSFUL INTRODUCTION OF NEW PLANTS, TREES AND 
SHRUBS, FOR SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA. THE COMMERCIAL NURSERYMEN IN TURN MAY 
THEN PROPAGATE THE PLANT MATERIAL AND DISTRIBUTE IT TO THEIR CUSTOMERS. 

A COPY OF THIS BILL FOLLOWS: 

"THE BOARD OF SUPERVISORS MAY SELL AT A PRICE NOT LESS THAN THE COUNTY 1 S 
ESTIMATED COST, SURPLUS PLANTS, SHRUBS, FLOWERS, TREES, AND VEGETATION, AND 
THEIR SEEDS OR PRODUCTS, PRODUCED AT THE COUNTY ARBORETUM. THE BOARD MAY 
ALSO EXCHANGE SUCH MATERIALS FOR OTHER MATERIALS OF APPROXIMATELY THE SAME 
VALUE WITH ANY PERSON, ENTITY, POLITICAL ENTITY, OR NATION, OR MAY DISTRIBUTE 
SUCH MATERIALS WITHOUT CHARGE TO ANY PERSON, ENTITY OR POLITICAL ENTITY IN 
THIS STATE FOR THE PURPOSE OF TESTING SUCH MATERIALS UNDER CONDITIONS NOT 
OBTAINABLE AT THE COUNTY ARBORETUM, IF IN THE DISCRETION OF THE BOARD OF 
SUPERVISORS SUCH EXCHANGE OR TESTING WILL BENEFIT THE ARBORETUM OR FACILITATE 
THE ACCOMPLISHMENT OF THE PURPOSES SPECIFIED IN SECTION 25920. NO SUCH 
PLANT, SHRUB, FLOWER, TREE, SEED OR THEIR PRODUCT MAY BE SOLD IF SUCH PLANT, 
SHRUB, FLOWER, TREE, SEED OR THFIR PRODUCT IS AVAILABLE COMMERCIALLY WITHIN 
THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA.". 



PROPAGATION 



NEARLY ALL THE PLANTS GOING TO THE FIELD LOCATIONS HAVE THEIR BEGINNING 
IN THE HANDS OF THE ARBORETUM PROPAGATOR. AS AN AID TO HIS WORK, A SECOND 
35' X 100 » GLASSHOUSE WITH AN ATTACHED HEADH0U3E FACILITY CAME UNDER CON- 
STRUCTION THIS YEAR. IN ADDITION, TWO SMALL ORCHID GROWING HOUSES WERE COM- 
PLETED. THE MONEY FOR THE LATTER TWO HOUSES WAS DONATED BY PRIVATE INDIVIDUALS. 

PREVIOUSLY REPORTED WAS THE CONSTRUCTION OF A MIST PROPAGATION BENCH, 
USED FOR THE ROOTING OF CUTTINGS. THIS YEAR, THIS BENCH WAS ENLARGED TO 
ACCOMMODATE THE INCREASED DEMAND FOR PLANTING MATERIAL IN THE VARIOUS SECTIONS 
OF THE ARBORETUM. 

A LARGE STEAM STERILIZER FOR SOIL HAS BEEN INCORPORATED INTO THE PROPA- 
GATION PROCEDURES. CONTROL OF PATHOGENIC ORGANISMS, DETREMENTAL TO EARLY 
PLANT GROWTH, NOW CAN BE MORE CERTAIN. 

TO HELP MAINTAIN PROPER TEMPERATURE AND HUMIDITY WITHIN THE GLASSHOUSE, 
A "HIGH" FOG WATER SPRAY WAS INSTALLED. THIS IS AN AUTOMATIC DEVICE, ACTI- 
VATED THROUGH THERMOSTATIC CONTROL. 



THE USE OF PLASTIC FILMS, EITHER IN SHEET OR BAG FORM, IS FINDING MORE 
AND MORE APPLICATION IN MODERN PLANT PROPAGATION. HERE IT HAS BEEN USED WITH 
REMARKABLE SUCCESS IN THE GERMINATION OF FERN SPORES. 




The beginnings of our second glasshouse. Office 
facilities will be located in the concrete block 
headhouse at the far end. 



PLANT RECORDS 



IT IS THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE PLANT RECORDER TO KEEP ACCURATE 
RECORDS OF ALL PLANT MATERIAL ENTERING OR LEAVING THE ARBORETUM. HIS 
RECORDS INCLUDE THE LIFE HISTORY OF EACH PLANT, FROM SEED TO MATURE 
SPECIMEN. THESE RECORDS FURNISH INFORMATION TO THE PUBLIC CONCERNING THE 
PROPAGATION AND CULTURE OF THE PLANTS SEEN GROWING AT THE ARBORETUM. THE 
FITNESS OF THE THOUSANDS OF NEWLY INTRODUCED SPECIMENS TO GROW AND SURVIVE 
IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA CAN READILY BE ASCERTAINED FROM RECORDS SUCH AS 



THIS SERVICE IN ITSELF IS OF MAJOR IMPORTANCE NOT ONLY TO THE ARBOR- 
ETUM, BUT TO THE HORTICULTURIST AND PLANT SCIENTISTS WHO ARE ENDEAVORING 
TO IMPROVE THE BEAUTY AND PRACTICAL ASPECT OF THE PLANT LIFE IN THIS AREA. 



SEED AND PLANT CONTROL FOR 1956-57 



SEED PLANTED 
CUTTINGS INSERTED 
PERMANENT 



2151 

896 packages 
4621 

9039 



AN ALUMINUM LABEL SIMILAR TO THE ONE BELOW IDENTIFIES EACH PLANT 
IN THE FIELD. FOR DETAILED INFORMATION ABOUT THE PLANT, ONE NEED ONLY 
INQUIRE WITH THE NUMBER AND FIGURE STAMPED IN THE UPPER LEFT HAND CORNER 
OF THE LABEL. SUCH LABELS ARE PREPARED BY THE OFFICE OF THE PLANT 
RECORDER. 



54-S-1028 
CiSTUS TAURfCUS 
CIST4CEAE ITALY 



ARBORETUM NURSERY 



OF PLANT QUALITY THROUGH 

INCREASING THE USE OF ONE GALLON SIZE CONTAINERS FOR NURSERY STOCK, 
NECESSITATES MOVING THE PLANTS TO THE FIELD BEFORE THEY BECOME TOO LARGE OR 
THEIR ROOTS BECOME CAN-BOUND. 



WITH ADDITIONAL HELP AVAILABLE, IT WAS POSSIBLE TO GIVE CLOSER ATTENTION 
TO WATERING, FERTILIZATION AND SANITATION SCHEDULES. 

AND LASTLY, WINTER FROST PROTECTION WITHIN THE LATHHOUSE WAS AIDED 
THROUGH THE USE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA DEVELOPED RETURN-STACK ORCHARD 
HEATERS. 

THE WORK OF THE NURSERY, THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE LATHHOUSE AND THE 
VARIETY OF PLANT MATERIAL BEING GROWN, BROUGHT MANY INTERESTED VISITORS TO 
THIS AREA SEEKING ANSWERS TO THEIR INDIVIDUAL HORTICULTURAL PROBLEMS. 



THE WEATHERMAN 



LOWEST TEMPERATURE 




31 DEG. F. JAN. 28, 1957 


HIGHEST TEMPERATURE 




107 DEG. F. SEPT. 9, 1956 
JUNE 18, 1957 


TOTAL RAINFALL 




16.39 INCHES 


HIGHEST MONTHLY TOTAL 


RAIN 


5.56 


HIGHEST DAILY TOTAL RAIN 


2.76 « 


TOTAL EVAPORATION 




53. H 



DEMONSTRATION HOME GARDENS 

TO DEMONSTRATE TO HOME OWNERS HOW TO USE THE NEW ORNAMENTAL TREES AND 
SHRUBS INTRODUCED INTO SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA THROUGH THE ARBORETUM RESEARCH 
PROGRAM, FOUR HOME DEMONSTRATION GARDENS ARE BEING DEVELOPED. PLANS FOR 
THESE GARDENS WERE OBTAINED THROUGH A LANDSCAPE CONTEST OPENED TO ALL 
REGISTERED LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA. 

THE ARCHITECTS OF THE WINNING DESIGNS WERE THEN RETAINED TO DEVELOP 
AN OVERALL MASTER PLAN FOR THE FOUR GARDENS AS WELL AS TO MAKE PLANS FOR 
THE MASONRY AND WOOD STRUCTURES AND PLANTING LISTS. 

THROUGH THE CALIFORNIA ARBORETUM FOUNDATION, SUNSET MAGAZINE HAS 
SUPPLIED BOTH THE AWARD MONEY FOR THE WINNING DESIGNS AND THE RETAINER FEES 
FOR THE SELECTED LANDSCAPE DESIGNERS. IN ADDITION, SUNSET MAGAZINE HAS 
CONTRIBUTED FREELY OF THE TIME OF ITS STAFF OF GARDEN SPECIALISTS IN PLANNING 
THESE GARDENS. 



THE FIRST GARDEN IS DESIGNED FOR THE HOME OWNER WHO HAS A SMALL BOAT 
ON A TRAILER PARKED IN THE GARAGE. ON WEEKENDS, HE LEAVES THE GARDEN FOR 
THE SEASHORE OR MOUNTAIN LAKES. HIS YARD IS PLANNED TO BE ONE OF LOW 
MAINTENANCE. PUNTS GROWN HERE WILL REQUIRE THE MINIMUM OF ATTENTION AND 
WATERING. IT WILL NOT BE NECESSARY FOR THIS FAMILY TO STAY HOME WEEKENDS 
TO WATER THE YARD. 

IN CONTRAST, THE SECOND GARDEN IS PLANNED FOR A RETIRED COUPLE WHO ARE 
INTERESTED IN MAINTAINING A GARDEN OF UNUSUAL PLANTS. THEY HAVE THE TIME 
TO SPEND IN GIVING SUCH PLANTS ALL OF THE ATTENTION THEY NEED. THIS GARDEN 
WILL BE RECOGNIZED AS THE PLANT COLLECTORS GARDEN. 




Site of the Home Demonstration Gardens north of 
the Administration Building. Various treatments of 
concrete slab surfaces are visible in the foreground. 



THE THIRD GARDEN IS DESIGNED A3 THE HOME OF A RISING YOUNG EXECUTIVE. 
IT IS VISUALIZED HE MAY BE ABOUT L,2 YEARS OLD. HE USES HIS GARDEN TO EN- 
TERTAIN CLIENTS AND TRANSACT BUSINESS. HIS GARDEN WILL BE RECOGNIZED AS THE 
ENTERTAINERS GARDEN. 

THE FOURTH GARDEN IN THIS SERIES WILL BE FOR THE MAN AND WIFE WHO HAVE 
FOUR CHILDREN RANGING IN AGE FROM TWO TO NINE AND WHO HAVE A DOG. THE DOG 
BURIES BONES IN THE FLOWER BEDS AND TAKES AFTERNOON SNOOZES IN THE FERNS. 
THE CHILDREN CLIMB THE TREES, RIDE TRICYCLES OFF OF THE FATHE3 AND FREQUENTLY 
BREAK OFF A CHOICE FLOWER IN THEIR ECSTACY OF A GAME OF HIDE AND SEEK. THIS 
GARDEN IS DESIGNED TO BE VERY PRACTICAL AND VERY FUNCTIONAL. THE PLANTING 
MATERIAL WILL BE ATTRACTIVE BUT ALSO RUGGED. SOME DEVICES WILL BE USED TO 
CONTROL THE WHEEL TOY PROBLEM SUCH AS HAVING SLIGHTLY RAISED BEDS FOR MANY 
OF THE ANNUALS. 

INSTALLATION OF THESE GARDENS WAS BEGUN LATE IN THE SPRING OF 1957. IT 
IS HOPED THAT AT LEAST ONE GARDEN MAY BE OPENED FOR THE PUBLIC DURING THE 
WINTER OF 1957. IT IS ANTICIPATED THAT EACH YEAR ONE OF THE GARDENS WILL BE 
REPLANTED WITH NEW INTRODUCTIONS. THIS WILL SERVE TO SUSTAIN INTEREST IN 
THIS PROJECT AS WELL A3 TO ALLOW A CURRENT DISPLAY OF THE NEW PLANTS RECOMMEND- 
ED FOR GROWING IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA. 




Circular, colored, concrete stepping stones 
lead through the Entertainer's Garden 



ARBORETUM LIBRARY 

THE MOVE TO OUR NEW ADMINISTRATION BUILDING BROUGHT GREAT SATISFACTION 
TO OUR LIBRARY STAFF. FIRST, BOOK SHELVING SPACE WAS INCREASED. SECOND, A 
SMALL READING CORNER WAS GAINED, A LUXURY LACKING IN OUR FORMER BUILDING. 
THIRD, STORAGE SPACE IN THE BASEMENT HAS BROUGHT ALL OUR BOOKS AND PERIODI- 
CALS UNDER ONE ROOF FOR THE FIRST TIME IN NEARLY EIGHT YEARS. 

THE NEW FACILITIES MAY HAVE BEEN RESPONSIBLE FOR THE 150 PERCENT IN- 
CREASE IN THE USE CF THE LIBRARY 1 S RESOURCES BY TEACHERS, STUDENTS, HORTI- 
CULTURISTS AND OTHER NON-STAFF MEMBERS. THE CLASSIFICATION SCHEME FOR OUR 
REFERENCE MATERIALS WAS USED WITH EQUAL EASE BY THE AMATEUR AS WELL AS THE 
PROFESSIONAL PLANTSMAN. ADAPTED FROM THE MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 
LIBRARY, THIS SYSTEM IS PARTICULARLY DESIGNED FOR LIBRARIES NOT ONLY DEVOTED 
TO HORTICULTURAL AND BOTANICAL FIELDS, BUT ALSO SERVES FOR THE RELATED 
BRANCHES OF SCIENCE AND HISTORY. 

AMDNG THE ACQUISITIONS OF THE LIBRARY WAS A RECENT REPRINT OF THE 
GRAY HERBARIUM CARD INDEX, ISSUES 1-218. THIS INDEX OF PLANTS OF THE WESTERN 
HEMISPHERE IS A MOST USEFUL TOOL FOR THE PLANT TAXONOMIST. 




BOOKS 

PAMPHLETS 

NON-CURRENT SERIALS 

LOAN NON-CURRENT SERIALS 

CURRENT SERIAL PUBLICATIONS 

BOUND: NON-CURRENT SERIALS 



ARBORETUM VISITORS 



THE ARBORETUM ENJOYED AN 
EXTREMELY SATISFYING VISITATION 
RECORD THIS YEAR. TWICE AS 
MANY VISITORS PASSED THROUGH 
OUR TURNSTILES AS THE YEAR 
BEFORE. 

FOR THE FIRST TIME, THE 
GROUNDS WERE OFEN SEVEN DAYS 
A WEEK AND VISITORS COULD WALK 
THROUGHOUT THE PLANTINGS AT 
THEIR LEISURE. THESE TWO 
OPERATIONAL PROCEDURES MAY BE 
PRIMARILY RESPONSIBLE FOR THE 
INCREASED ATTENDANCE. 




The Information Center and Gatehouse. The 
staff here answers questions by the public 
on gardening and horticulture. Guided tours 
of the Arboretum initiate here also. 




OUR VISITORS CAME FROM NEAR AND 
FAR: RIVERSIDE GARDEN CLUB, AMERICAN 
ASSOCIATION OF NURSERIES AND BOTANIC 
ARCHITECTS. EACH OF THE 48 STATES WERE 
REPRESENTED. THE MINISTRY OF FOREIGN 
AFFAIRS, CAMBODIA; DIRECTOR OF FINANCE, 
CAIRO, EGYPT; HELSINKI, FINLAND; SOUTH 
AFRICA; AUSTRALIA, AND TOKYO. 



NOTABLY, SPRINGTIME HAS ALWAYS BEEN THE MOST POPULAR SIGHT- 
SEEING SEASON. THE LOW ATTENDANCE POINTS REFLECT THE RAIN 
SEASON. AS PLANTINGS DEVELOP WHICH WILL INCREASE THE FALL 
COLOR, AUTUMN VISITATION WILL GROW IN NUMBERS. 

THESE GRAPHS DO NOT DISTINGUISH BETWEEN WEEKDAY AND WEEKEND 
ATTENDANCE. FORMERLY, THE UTTER HAS ALWAYS BEEN THE GREATER; 
THIS YEAR, WEEKDAY TOTALS ACCOUNTED FOR NEARLY 5C PERCENT OF 
EACH WEEK'S TOTAL. 

CHILDREN ATTENDANCE FROM SCHOOLS, CHURCHES AND YOUTH OR- 
GANIZATIONS (TOURS MADE BY RESERVATION) TOTALLED 12,459. 
A CONSERVATIVE ESTIMATE OF NUMBERS OF ALL CHILDREN INCLUDED 
IN THE YEAR'S TOTAL WOULD PROBABLY BE 30 PERCENT. 



tumulative^ftlonthlylotaLs fo\ 



7955-56 & 19^6-^7 



This monthly cumulative graph shows that the greatest increase 
attendance was in the latter six months of the fiscal year. 



EDUCATION 



THE TERM "EDUCATION" HAS A DIFFERENT MEANING FOR EACH PERSON. REGARDLESS 
OF THE INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES, THERE IS A GENERAL AGREEMENT THAT TO HAVE AN 
EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCE, ONE MUST FEEL, SEE OR LEARN SOMETHING ABOUT WHICH HE 
HAD LITTLE PREVIOUS KNOWLEDGE. 

THE SATISFACTION OF THIS DEFINITION TAKES TITO FORMS AT THE 
ARBORETUM. ONE IS INFORMAL, THE OTHER A MORE FORMAL EDUCATION 
PROGRAM, COMPOSED OF REGULAR CLASS MEETINGS. 

THE INFORMAL PROGRAM IS OUR GUIDED JEEP TRAIN 
TOURS, AN EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCE PARTICIPATED IN 
BY THE GREATER PORTION OF THE 103,000 VISITORS TO 
THE ARBORETUM THIS YEAR. 




THE FORMAL PROGRAM IS A 
SERIES OF CLASSES IN HORTI- 
CULTURE, BOTANY AND PLANT 
AESTHETICS. 

BOTH FORMS OF OUR EDUCATIONAL 
ACTIVITIES, INCREASING IN SERVICE 
OVER THE PREVIOUS YEAR, LOOK TO THE 
1957-58 SEASON FOR PLAYING EVEN A 
GREATER ROLE IN THE OVERALL LIFE 
CF THE ARBORETUM. 



Information Aid, Denis Kucera, explains 
the phenomenon of a natural graft in this 
Englemann oak to a group of school children. 




Mrs. Jane Morse conducted 
a class in "Art in Nature" 
for children between the 
ages of 7 and 14. Here 
she helps two pupils 
master the techniques of 
finger painting. 




<h, 



Dr. Lawson, a member of the 
Southern California Unit of 
the Herb Society of America 
explaining the secrets of 
cocking with herbs. 
Delicious samples of this 
art can be seen on the 
table. 




Members of the evening class in 
Home Landscaping discuss their 
problems in design and the use of 
plant materials. Mr. Eric Johnsc 
Instructor, is at the blackboard 




GRAND TOTAL OF REGISTERED STUDENTS 748 

GRAND TOTAL OF PUPIL HOURS OF INSTRUCTION 3051 



CLASSES FOR FALL OF 1957 



JUNIOR BIRD STUDY 
PRACTICAL ORCHID CULTURE 
TREE IDENTIFICATION 
BEGINNING PLANT IDENTIFICATION 



HERB LECTURES 

BOTANICAL SKETCHING 

HOME LANDSCAPING 

ADVANCED PLANT IDENTIFICATION 



RESEARCH 



RESEARCH, USING P. SPECIFIC METHOD OF PROCEDURE, ATTEMPTS TO SOLVE PROBLEMS 
OR EXPLAIN OBSERVATIONS ENCOUNTERED IN A PARTICULAR FIELD OF STUDY. PROBLEMS 
IN HORTICULTURE ARE MANY. DURING THE FAST YEAR, THE ARBORETUM MADE PROGRESS 
ALONG CERTAIN LINES OF ESTABLISHED PROJECTS AND INITIATED NEW AREAS OF IN- 
VESTIGATION. 

THE FIRE RESISTANT PLANT PROJECT 

THE FOLLOWING IS AN ABSTRACT OF A PAPER PRESENTED AT THE ANNUAL MEETING 
OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, AUGUST 26-30, 1956, HELD *T 
THE UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT, STORRS, COM. 

"A Germination Inhibitor in Cistus salvifolius . an introduced plant for erosion 
control in So. California". Gustaf Juhren, L. B. Martin and Marcella Juhren. 

Periodic fires in the chaparral vegetation of southern California mountains 
present constant reforestration and erosion control problems. Growing con- 
ditions on these exposed mountain slopes are severe. Introduced plant species 
are often used to supplement native vegetation. Species of Cistus (Rock Rose), 
a Mediterranean native, is able to grow under these conditions and in addition 
shows a certain degree of resistance to burning. Cistus seed germinated 
sporadically over long periods when grown in the greenhouse and when directly 
seedea m the field Charcoal mixed with seedbed soil appeared to hasten and 



vated charcoal ajid germinated under controlled' 



conditions (light, moisture, 



charcLl ti resu " ed ln = e£r i ler germination than in the control without 
at tnei* w f er n ? ,b ?L 0f u Seedlings P r ° d »<=ed in 10 days was significant 
„ a H J e ,f \*™] ^red with the control. A second set of seeds germinated 
under identical conditions but in which the seedlings were removed each dav 
oflerSnaUo^inh^-t 1 ", ™*% «*«*-'*• suggesf the ™Ie of ome (ype 
for thT?wo «ti S I > t S ° f £M ^ SSMfolius. The total germination 
the t^Zttt^llT^lTUlll^ «**«-«» "«*«* at the g end of 




Inspection of Cistus seedling plots 
established on a recent burn in the 
Sen Bernardino Mts. This is a co- 

Stat^^ V6 ? tUre between the United 
States Forest Service and the Arboretum. 

30 




THE ELECTRIC FURNACE 

THE FURNACE IN THE ILLUSTRATION (RIGHT) 
WAS CONSTRUCTED TO TEST LEAF SAMPLES FOR FIRE 
RESISTANT PROFERTIES. THE OPERATING TEMPERATURE 
AT THE CENTER OF THE FURNACE IS APPROXIMATELY 
950 DEG. F. FOUR ELECTRICAL RESISTANCE WIRES, 
FASTENED ALONG THE INNER WALLS OF THE FURNACE, 
SERVE AS HEATING ELEMENTS. 

A SINGLE LEAF OF A PLANT SPECIES IS INSERT- 
ED INTO THE MIDDLE OF THE OVEN, USING A PAIR OF 
LONG HANDLED TONGS. THE LENGTH OF TIME REQUIRED 
FOR LEAF TO BURST INTO FLAMES IS RECORDED. THESE 
DATA ARE USED AS A SCALE OF FIRE RESISTANCE. 

THE FIRST EXPERIMENT, USING BOTH FRESH AND DRIED LEAVES, SHOWED THAT THE 
DIFFERENCE IN TIME REQUIRED FOR THE VARIOUS LEAF SPECIES TO BURST INTO FLAME 
WAS STATISTICALLY SIGNIFICANT. 

THE ARBORETUM HAS CONTINUED TO COOPERATE WITH THE U.S. FOREST SERVICE IN 
FIELD PLOT TESTS OF CISTUS THROUGHOUT THE ADJACENT MOUNTAIN AREA. FURTHER, 
MANY OTHER LOCAL, STATE AND FEDERAL AGENCIES HAVE BECOME INTERESTED IN FIRE 
CONTROL BY PLANT MATERIAL, COOPERATIVE WORK THROUGH CISTUS SEED DISTRIBUTION 
AND CONFERENCES HAVE BEEN ESTABLISHED WITH THESE AGENCIES. AT PRESENT THE 
ARBORETUM IS SERVING AS A COORDINATOR IN THIS INITIAL STUDY OF FIRE REoISTANT 
PLANT RESEARCH. 



THE FLOWER CARPET PROJECT 

WITH A RESEARCH GRANT OF *9,000 TO THE CALIFORNIA ft ^^™/^.™ 
INC., FROM THE LONGWOCD FOUNDATION, STUDIES VETC INITIATED CN TIE ™JER 
CARPET PROJECT" THE OBJECT OF THESE STUDIES IS TC DEVELOF THE MEAN* CF 
dSaFjSaI FLOHBUnO PLANTS, SUCH AS THOSE FOUND IN THE MOJAVE AND COLORADO 
DESERTS, ON A CARPETING MATERIAL WHICH COULD THEN HE USED IN THE ^^JJ™ 
OF FLOATS, AS FOR EXAMPLE IN Tffi ROSE PARADE, ^ IN OMR PLACES WHERE FLORAL 
DISPLAYS ARE DESIRH). THIS PROJECT HAS BEEN IN PROGRESS SINCE JANUARY 1957. 
STUDIES ARE NOW IN PROGRESS REGARDING THE BEST METHODS OF GER- 

minat^Ts^TaT^S Ss ^^^^^TTt^jo^^^ 

VARIOUS KINDS OF SEEDS. THE STUDIES ON ™™^J£JX™™™^™?* 
MADE AT THE CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, EARHART PLANT LABORATORY. 



Flower Garnet. Lower half of pan, 
needling Alyssum, (left) removed from 
moisture chamber one week after plants 
at right. Upper, California poppy- 
seedlings. Seeds germinated on foam 
plastic or urethane plastic set on 
vermiculite and fed 3 times a week 
with nutrients. 




THE PLANT HORMONE STUDIES 

GIBBERELLIC ACID, A RELATIVELY NEW CHEMICAL IN THE FIELD OF PLANT HORMONES 
13 NOW READILY AVAILABLE FOR RESEARCH AND HORTICULTURAL USES. IN GENERAL, IT HAS 
THE EFFECT OF CAUSING ELONGATION OF PLANT CELLS. THIS RESPONSE MAY HAVE NUMEROUS 
HORTICULTURAL AND AGRICULTURAL APPLICATIONS WHEN IT IS DESIRED TO OBTAIN TALLER 
PLANTS, FASTER. 

vp^ 1 ,!??^ THE WIDE ropuLAR INTEREST IN GIBBERELLIC ACID, A SERIES OF EXPERI 

tom of ms^ ( ?SS. WSRE INITIATED AT THE ARB0RETUM - A BRIEF PR0GRESS RE - 

A " ^^M^^LS 1 ? LINGS ° F ERMT KEMUM ATRCPURPUREUM. LANOLIN PASTE 
kl^whS? (PARTS ™ MILLI ° N) CF G ™ERELLIC ACID WAS APPLIED 
tLt ?£L AT THS UP?ER M0ST N0DE ' ■ MEASUREMENTS SHOWED BOTH THE INTER- 
^T™^^.™™ N ° DE GREW SIG »™ ™ TH AN R 

B * ™ T S ™ LING STEMS 0F CARIGA PAPAYA VAR. SOLO, A LANOLIN RING WAS 
APPLIED CONTAINING GIBBERELLlFlciD. No"eLONGATION OF sS WAS 
Sf5Sf?A.SS WEVER ' A GR ° OTH IN STEM ™ICKn£ss StS 1^ SITE 
OF APPLICATION. FURTHER STUDIES SHOULD REVEAL WHETHER CELL SIZE OR 
CELL NUMBER WAS INCREASED BY THE TREATMENT. 

C * ™J??: SUGGESTI0N °E MR. GWYNN WILSON OF COACHELLA VALLEY TESTS WFRF 
INITIATED TO DETERMINE THE EFFECT OF SPRAY INgIppLICAT IONS OF CTZmT 
ELLIC ACID ON YOUNG GRAPE CLUSTERS. THE OracftfS TO^SeSiK 
™ X L?™ G0ULD BE ™ UCED T0 UNGATE SU^ICIEOTLY TO MO^M 
NECESSITY OF CLUSTER THINNING. HARVEST DATA SHOWED that l cmLnT 




Thompson Seedless grapes harvested June 21 1957 f7 .„ m 
flower clusters sprayed with 100 pp ra GibWellie'ao^ 
on April 9, 1957. Above, left, spraved Jill 
sprayed. Below, elose-up view '„? indivlrtn w' ??"" 
alternating non^sprayed Ld ^yedlr^ft^^t. 



yz 



SPECIAL EVENTS 




La Posada on the veranda of the Hugo Reid Adobe, 
presented by children of the Little Theater. This 
group is sponsored by the Arboretum Historical 
Committee. 



A 


•v*y 


^N\ 


' \ 


-^.^«— «—» — 


•ural'ma* 




3d ». kW. to_ MU, M*. 


tggg^^- 


£« at^-TJs-s-rr- 







THE INCREASED ATTENDANCE WAS A REFLECTION 
CF PUBLIC INFORMATION ACTIVITIES THIS YEAR. 

WEEKLY NEWS RELEASES CARRIED STORIES OF 
NEW PLANT INTRODUCTIONS TO BIRD WALKS AND 
CONSTRUCTION ADVANCES. 

NEARLY 100 PROGRAMS WERE PRESENTED TO 
GARDEN CLUBS, CHURCHES AND CIVIC ORGANIZATIONS, 
BY TRAINED ARBORETUM PERSONNEL. 

THE ARBORETUM WAS INVITED TO DISPLAY 
EDUCATIONAL AND RESEARCH MATERIALS IN SEVEN 
FLOWER SHOWS, IN THE SOUTHLAND AREA. 

MANY TRADE MAGAZINES CARRIED INDIVIDUAL 
STORIES OF THE ARBORETUM, COVERING A VARIETY 
OF SUBJECTS. 

SPECIAL EVENTS HELD AT THE ARBORETUM, SUCH 
AS LA POSADA, INTERESTED FIRST TIME VISITORS WHO 
LATER RETURNED FOR A COMPLETE TOUR OF THE 
GROUNDS. 



I 




c0 oP erti 






*a^>. 



Mr. Joe Kelly, representing the Boy 
Scouts of the San Gabriel Valley 
Council, accepts an Italian Stone 
pine from Dr. Stewart. Six such 
trees were given to the Boy Scouts at 
our Arbor Day program. 





Various lawn equipment on display 
during the Home Owners Lawn Field 



Arboretum staff members help 
release gift of wild fowl from 
the Sacramento National Wildlife 
Refuge. 





The Arboretum's display at 

Descanso Gardens annual Camilla Show. 



CALIFORNIA ARBORETUM FOUNDATIONJNC. 

ACTING NOW AS A SPONSORING ORGANIZATION, THE CALIFORNIA ARBORETUM 
FOUNDATION, INC. SERVES THE ARBORETUM IN MANY WAYS. THE FOUNDATION DESERVES 
MUCH CREDIT FOR ITS WORK OF OBTAINING GIFTS OF PUNTS AND OTHER MATERIALS 
FOR THE ARBORETUM. THE GIFTS, DIVERSE IN KIND, ARE ALL OF CONSIDERABLE 
VALUE AND REPRESENT THE INDIVIDUAL'S BELIEF IN THE FUTURE OF THE ARBORETUM'S 
WORK WITHIN THF COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES* 

RECENT GIFTS: 

1. THE ROBERT C. CASAMAJOR ORCHID PROPAGATING HOUSE 

2. THE J. F. DOUGLAS MEMORIAL ORCHID HOUSE 

3. THE BOYLE ORCHID LITHOGRAPH COLLECTION (Through donated funds) 

4. THE COOKE REDV/OOD GREENHOUSES 

5. PHOENIX RECLINATA PALMS 

6. A COLLECTION OF 6,250 CYMBIDIUM ORCHID PLANTS FROM THE MOSHER FOUNDATION 

7. THF ARTHUR FREED CYPRIPEDIUM ORCHID COLLECTION 

8. THE MCFIE CYPRIPEDIUM ORCHID COLLECTION 

9. A CRYSTAL CHANDELIER FOR THE "QUEEN ANNE COTTAGE" (Through donated funds) 

10. A MELODEON FROM MR. WINSTON S. CRUSE 

11. FIVE THOUSAM) ARBORETUM BIRD CHECK LISTS FROM MR. W. DAN QUATTLEBAUM 




The Casamejor and Douglas Orchid H 
make it possible for visitors to s« 
species and learn something of the 




The Foundation sponsored Jeep 
Train makes touring the Arboretu 
more pleasant. 



example of the lithograph 
orchid prints from the 
Boyle collection. 




A 



?Lasca Leaves", the official publi- j 
cation of the Foundation, is pub- 
lished quarterly in conjunction with 
the Southern California Horticultural . 
Society. It carries articles on 
horticulture, work of the Arboretum, 
California history, and research data 
in the fields of horticulture and 
botany. It has a circulation of about 
1000. 





*«*. J ls n ? a plcture of just en y ero Up of 

strings will be touched with sadness when you learn 
the poultry truth of this scene. Almost fLm the 
shell, this peacock was raised with a duck Together 

Bub^d "p^cho^thio" ^eacLf %it the path ° S ° re United - 



PICTURE CREDIT 



photos by J. Shulman and loaned by the Concrete Masonry Institute 

# 3 Entrance to the Administration Building 

# U Entrance Pavilion 

# 5 Lecture Room 

# 6 Administration Building Patio 

# 13 Front Yard of the Administration Building 

# 2A Information Center 



# 8 Hugo Reid Excavation — Edith Wallace 

# 9 Archaeology Students — Arcadia Tribune 

> 18 Antelope Valley Test Station — Marie T. Walsh 

# 27 Information Aid — Independent Star-News 

# 29 Mrs. Jane Morse — Independent Star-News 

# 4.8 Arbor Day — Arcadia Tribune 



Editorial Staff 

Louis Martin, Editor 
Gerry Patten, Illustrator 
Joyce Day, Production 



3 1753 00383 8478